Kaltes Klares Kaisers Wasser

Carl, Sun Kingdom Top Designer ~ Soredemo Sekai wa Utsukushii E04

ELEGANCE IS AN ATTITUDE

Nike, the fourth princess of the Rain Dukedom and one who holds the power to call forth the rain, travels to the Sun Kingdom to marry Sun King Livius for her country, despite her own reluctance. She soon discovers that the King, who conquered the world in only three years after his ascendance to the throne, is still a child!! Furthermore, for trivial reasons, he has demanded that Nike call forth the rain, and when she refuses, he has her thrown in jail. The story follows the two who, while at first are a married couple only in name, gradually begin to establish an emotional bond with one another.
(wiki)

ARTISTIC DETACHMENT IN JAPANESE AESTHETICS

THe Japanese tradition of Zen aestheticism has articulated a variety of highly refined, elegant, and pervasive qualities of atmospheric beauty such as aware (sad beauty), yugen (profound mystery), wabi (rustic poverty), sabi (loneliness), shibumi (elegant restraint), ma (negative space), iki (chic), and furyu or fuga (windblow elegance). Although it is common for studies of Zen Buddhism and Eastern culture to mention such aesthetic ualities in order to convey the Japanese sense of beauty, they generally neglect the aesthetic attitude of detached contemplation required for the intuition of beauty. As emphasied by scholars like Izutsu Toshihiko (1981:16), the immediately felt aesthetic qualities described in Japanese poetics – aware and yugen, for example, are derivatives from the fundamental value of yojo : “overtones of feeling”, “overflow of feeling”, or “surplus feeling”. Continuing this tradition the modern Japanese philosopher Nishida Kitaro has observed how traditional Japanese culture is based on pure aesthetic feeling; hence aware and yugen are both aesthetic qualities felt just as they are in emptiness/suchness at the locus of absolute nothingness.

Artistic Detachment in Japan and the West: Psychic Distance in Comparative Aesthetics, Steve Odin, 2001, p99

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s