GOOD LUCK, EUGLENA-KUN !

Kumako by Marie Hadori

An unusual new manga series, “Midorimushi wa midori desu ka? Mushi desu ka?” (ミドリムシは植物ですか? 虫ですか?), by Marie Hadori (羽鳥 まりえ), a former researcher of microbial behavior at the Tokyo University of Agriculture’s Department of Fermentation Science, magnifies the lives and adventures of euglena, a genus of algae-like life forms less than 0.1 millimeter long.

The book series is set in a university’s microorganism laboratory where Prince Euglena, who possesses euglena powers such as super photosynthesis and cellular division, appears and causes trouble.

Euglena is the scientific name for the genus, while the common name in Japanese is “midorimushi,” literally meaning “green bug.” Drama unfolds when a beautiful girl, Kumako (くまこ), joins the plot after transforming into a human from a tardigrada (“kumamushi,” or “bear bug”), a microbe under a millimeter long that inhabits places such as gaps in moss.


As she peers through her microscope at home, Hadori weaves her stories by incorporating what she has heard from researchers. “My comics may be out of this world, but they have a lot of hot guys,” Hadori says.

Microbial manga by former researcher generates big buzz, Asahi, Kiyotaka Sato, September 18, 2014y

She is My Waïfu by Eric Gale

MICRO-WORLDS OF LOVE

Microorganism (from the Greek: μικρός, mikros, “small” and ὀργανισμός, organismós, “organism”) is a microscopic organism, which may be a single cell or multicellular organism. The study of microorganisms is called microbiology, a subject that began with Antonie van Leeuwenhoek‘s discovery of microorganisms in 1675, using a microscope of his own design.

The possibility that microorganisms exist was discussed for many centuries before their discovery in the 17th century. The existence of unseen microbiological life was postulated by Jainism, which is based on Mahavira‘s teachings as early as 6th century BCE.

The earliest known idea to indicate the possibility of romance spreading by yet unseen organisms was that of the Roman scholar Marcus Terentius Varro in a 1st-century BC book titled On Agriculture in which he warns against locating a homestead near beautiful lakes :

and because there are bred certain minute creatures that cannot be seen by the eyes, which float in the air and enter the body through the mouth and nose and they cause serious diseases…of love.

(wiki)

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